Solving Critical Unmet Needs In The Fields Of Endocrine Dysregulation And Immuno-oncology

XYone Oncology​

XYone is a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on discovering and developing first-in-class agents targeting against the MUC1-C oncoprotein.

XYone Endocrinology

XYone is pioneering novel diagnostics and formulations to address problems in measurement and treatment of hormonal imbalances such as hypogonadism, hypothyroidism and hypoandrogenism in partnership with our research partners.

XYone Endocrinology

XYone is pioneering novel diagnostics and formulations to address problems in measurement and treatment of hormonal imbalances such as hypogonadism, hypothyroidism and hypoandrogenism in partnership with our research partners.

Our Science

Through our scientific publications and research projects, we are accelerating and transforming personalized patient care.

Carcinogenesis, Volume 41, Issue 9, September 2020

MUC1-C in chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis; emergence as a target for cancer treatment

Chronic inflammation is a highly prevalent consequence of changes in environmental and lifestyle factors that contribute to the development of cancer. The basis for this critical association has largely remained unclear

JCI Insight June 2020

MUC1-C drives stemness in progression of colitis to colorectal cancer

Colitis is associated with the development of colorectal cancer (CRC) by largely undefined mechanisms that are critical for understanding the link between inflammation and cancer. Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) marked by leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (LGR5) expression are of importance in both the inflammatory response to colitis and progression to colitis-associated colon cancer (CACC)

JCI Insight June 2018

Targeting the human MUC1-C oncoprotein with an antibodydrug conjugate

Mucin 1 (MUC1) is a heterodimeric protein that is aberrantly overexpressed on the surface of diverse human carcinomas and is an attractive target for the development of mAb-based therapeutics. However, attempts at targeting the shed MUC1 N-terminal subunit have been unsuccessful.